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Risk Factor Monitoring & Methods Branch Areas of Research

Diet

Diet, in all its complexity, is considered one of the major risk factors for cancer and is therefore a primary area of research within the Risk Factor Monitoring & Methods Branch. We work collaboratively with a wide range of researchers to conduct an integrated program that serves NCI as well as the extramural community. Our work involves monitoring research, methodologic research, and guidance- and policy-related research.

See a list of the Applied Research Program's activities and resources related to diet.

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Obesity Policy Research

Obesity is a risk factor for various types of cancer and for other chronic diseases. Obesity prevalence in the US has risen substantially in the last 50 years, particularly since the early 1980s. Experiences with tobacco control and other public health initiatives suggest that public policy may be a powerful tool to improve diet and physical activity behavior at the population level.

The Risk Factor Monitoring & Methods Branch supports various initiatives in obesity policy research, including promoting research on diet and physical activity that may inform policymaking and mesurement of the food and physical activity environments.

See a list of the Applied Research Program's activities and resources related to obesity policy research.

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Physical Activity

Current evidence convincingly indicates that physical activity reduces the risk of colon and breast cancer. Physical activity may also reduce risk of prostate cancer. Scientists are also evaluating potential relationships between physical activity and other cancers.

The Risk Factor Monitoring & Methods Branch supports the collection of physical activity data in existing and planned surveys. In doing so, we are attempting to develop more complete assessments of individuals' physical activity based on information derived from multiple contexts, including transportation, occupation, and recreation. We also conduct and support methodologic research to evaluate and improve physical activity assessment.

See a list of the Applied Research Program's activities and resources related to physical activity.

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Sun Exposure and Indoor Tanning

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun is known to be the leading cause of skin cancer, the most common type of cancer in the U.S. Likewise, it has become evident that exposure to artificial UV light such as from indoor tanning beds, sunbeds, and sun lamps also increases the risk of developing skin cancer. Some groups are more susceptible to the sun's and/or artificial sources' damaging rays than others, depending on their skin type and where they live. Consequently, it is important to monitor the population's sun exposure, use of indoor tanning equipment, and their behaviors for avoiding those exposures.

The Risk Factor Monitoring & Methods Branch monitors behaviors related to sun exposure and indoor tanning by adding questions to existing surveys, such as the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Cancer Control Supplement, California Health Interview Survey (CHIS), and National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (ADD HEALTH)External Web Site Policy. In addition RFMMB consults on questions added to the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) and the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS).

See a list of the Applied Research Program's activities and resources related to sun exposure.

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Tobacco Use

The Risk Factor Monitoring & Methods Branch monitors tobacco use through the use of surveys of the US household population, including the NCI-sponsored Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey (TUS-CPS) and the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). We are also involved in developing the tobacco-related questions that are periodically added to the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) Cancer Control Supplement. Information from these surveys allows us to monitor Americans' progress in reducing tobacco use, evaluate tobacco control programs, and conduct other tobacco-related research. We examine the data in terms of trends over time and patterns across various groups.

See a list of the Applied Research Program's activities and resources related to tobacco use.

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Last Modified: 19 May 2014