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Publication Abstract

Authors: Gilliland FD, Rosenberg RD, Hunt WC, Stauber P, Key CR

Title: Patterns of mammography use among Hispanic, American Indian, and non-Hispanic White women in New Mexico, 1994-1997.

Journal: Am J Epidemiol 152(5):432-7

Date: 2000 Sep 01

Abstract: For screening efforts to maximally reduce mortality in the general population, a large proportion of women need to utilize mammography routinely. To investigate utilization of mammography in a community setting, the authors used population-based data collected by the New Mexico Mammography Project for residents of the Albuquerque, New Mexico, metropolitan area for the period 1994-1997. The authors computed screening rates and the proportion of women who routinely use mammography. The utilization of mammography was low. Only 50% of the women aged 50-74 years were screened each year. Less than one third of women aged 40-49 years or 75 years and older were screened annually. The percentage of women who routinely used mammography on an annual or biennial basis was low in all age groups, especially among Hispanics and American Indians. Women aged 50-74 years had the highest percentage of routine annual mammography use, ranging from 30% in non-Hispanic Whites to 20% in Hispanics. Current utilization of mammography in community-based screening efforts is unlikely to achieve a potential 30% reduction in breast cancer mortality. Interventions are needed to increase the routine use of mammography.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013