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Publication Abstract

Authors: Gillern SM, Mahmoud NN, Paulson EC

Title: Local excision for early stage rectal cancer in patients over age 65 years: 2000-2009.

Journal: Dis Colon Rectum 58(2):172-8

Date: 2015 Feb

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Local excision of rectal cancer is an attractive option because it avoids the morbidity of radical resection. Concerns have arisen during the past decade, however, regarding substandard oncologic results. OBJECTIVE: Using the most recent Survey of Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data, we examined the change in the use of local excision for rectal cancer from 2000 to 2009 and examined patient, surgeon, and hospital factors related to its use. DESIGN: This study is a retrospective cohort study. SETTINGS: This study was conducted at a tertiary care medical center using Survey of Epidemiology and End Results-Medicare data. PATIENTS: Patients with pathologic Tis, T1, or T2 rectal cancer who were >65 years of age and underwent primary radical resection or local excision between 2000 and 2009 were included in this study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The change in the use of local excision for rectal cancer from 2000 to 2009 was the main outcome measured. RESULTS: A total of 8966 patients were identified. The use of local excision decreased significantly between 2000 and 2009. Women and patients who were older and had more comorbidities were significantly more likely to undergo local excision. Having a colorectal surgeon perform the surgery increased the odds of local excision by 1.5 times (p < 0.001). Similar trends were seen in patients operated on at the National Cancer Institute (OR, 1.7; p <0.001) and teaching hospitals (OR, 1.2; p = 0.003). Younger surgeons were more likely to perform local excisions. For surgeons graduating in 1980-1989 or 1990 and after, the odds of local excision were 1.40 (p = 0.001) and 2.1 (p <0.001) compared with surgeons graduating before 1970. LIMITATIONS: The study was limited by the retrospective design, and the data were collected by multiple healthcare officials in their representative institutions. CONCLUSIONS: In patient >65 years of age, the odds of undergoing local excision for early stage rectal cancer decreased significantly between 2000 and 2009, coincident with evidence of oncologic inferiority. However, there was still significant variation in its use. More studies are needed to better understand these variations in an attempt to bring more uniformity to the use of local excision in early stage rectal cancer.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013