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Publication Abstract

Authors: Heck KE, Wagener DK, Schatzkin A, Devesa SS, Breen N

Title: Socioeconomic status and breast cancer mortality, 1989 through 1993: an analysis of education data from death certificates.

Journal: Am J Public Health 87(7):1218-22

Date: 1997 Jul

Abstract: OBJECTIVES: This study examined whether more highly educated women were at greater risk of dying of breast cancer during 1989 through 1993. METHODS: Breast cancer mortality rates were calculated through death certificates and Current Population Survey data. RESULTS: Breast cancer mortality rates were highest among women with 12 and with 16 or more years of education. Non-Hispanic Black women had the highest mortality rates and Asian women the lowest. Positive relationships between mortality and education were found for Hispanic women as well as non-Hispanic Black and Asian women. CONCLUSIONS: The previously seen positive relationship between breast cancer mortality and education was found among US women of color but not non-Hispanic White women.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013