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Publication Abstract

Authors: Harnack L, Block G, Subar A, Lane S, Brand R

Title: Association of cancer prevention-related nutrition knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes to cancer prevention dietary behavior.

Journal: J Am Diet Assoc 97(9):957-65

Date: 1997 Sep

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship of cancer prevention-related nutrition knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes to cancer prevention dietary behavior. SUBJECTS/SETTING: Noninstitutionalized US adults aged 18 years and older. METHODS: Data collected in the 1992 National Health Interview Survey Cancer Epidemiology Supplement were analyzed. The supplement included questions to ascertain knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes and a food frequency questionnaire to ascertain nutrient intake. STATISTICS: Multivariate linear regression modeling was conducted to assess the hypothesized relationships. RESULTS: After adjustment for relevant covariates (age, sex, education, total energy, perceived barriers to eating a more healthful diet), knowledge and belief constructs were predictive of dietary behavior. Specifically, fat, fiber, and fruit and vegetable intakes more closely approximated dietary recommendations for persons with more cancer-prevention knowledge. The strength of the associations between these constructs and dietary behavior varied in some cases according to level of education and perceived barriers to eating a healthful diet. Of the perceived barriers to eating a healthful diet, perceived ease of eating a healthful diet was most strongly and consistently predictive of intake. CONCLUSIONS: Research findings challenge dietetics practitioners to design diet- and health-promotion programs and activities that not only educate the public about the importance of diet to health, but also address barriers to dietary change.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013