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Publication Abstract

Authors: Holt CL, Oster RA, Clay KS, Urmie J, Fouad M

Title: Religiosity and physical and emotional functioning among African American and White colorectal and lung cancer patients.

Journal: J Psychosoc Oncol 29(4):372-93

Date: 2011 Jul-Aug

Abstract: The literature suggests that religiosity helps cope with illness. The present study examined the role of religiosity in functioning among African Americans and Whites with a cancer diagnosis. Patients were recruited from an existing study and mailed a religiosity survey. Participants (N = 269; 36% African American, 56% women) completed the mail survey, and interview data from the larger cohort was utilized in the analysis. Multivariate analyses indicated that in the overall sample religious behaviors were marginally and positively associated with mental health and negatively with depressive symptoms. Among women, religious behaviors were positively associated with mental health and negatively with depressive symptoms. Religiosity was not a predictor of study outcomes for men. Among African Americans, religious behaviors were positively associated with mental health and vitality. Among Whites, religious behaviors were negatively associated with depressive symptoms. These findings suggest a mixed role of religious involvement in cancer outcomes. The current findings may have applied potential in the areas of emotional functioning and depression.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013