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Publication Abstract

Authors: Hoffman RM, Gilliland FD, Eley JW, Harlan LC, Stephenson RA, Stanford JL, Albertson PC, Hamilton AS, Hunt WC, Potosky AL

Title: Racial and ethnic differences in advanced-stage prostate cancer: the Prostate Cancer Outcomes Study.

Journal: J Natl Cancer Inst 93(5):388-95

Date: 2001 Mar 07

Abstract: BACKGROUND: African-Americans have twice the risk of non-Hispanic whites for presenting with advanced-stage prostate cancer. To investigate the reasons for this difference, we evaluated the association between race/ethnicity and advanced-stage prostate cancer, adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic, clinical, and pathologic factors. METHODS: A population-based cohort of 3173 men diagnosed with prostate cancer between October 1, 1994, and October 31, 1995, was analyzed. Medical record abstracts and self-administered survey questionnaires were used to obtain information regarding race/ethnicity, age, marital status, insurance status, educational level, household income, employment status, comorbidity, urinary function, prostate-specific antigen level, tumor grade, and clinical stage. The odds ratio (OR) for advanced-stage prostate cancer was estimated with weighted logistic regression analysis. All P: values were two-sided. RESULTS: Clinically advanced-stage prostate cancers were detected more frequently in African-Americans (12.3%) and Hispanics (10.5%) than in non-Hispanic whites (6.3%). Socioeconomic, clinical, and pathologic factors each accounted for about 15% of the increased relative risk. After adjusting for all covariates, the risk remained statistically significantly increased for African-Americans (OR = 2.26; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.43 to 3.58) but not for Hispanics (OR = 1.23; 95% CI = 0.73 to 2.08). CONCLUSION: Traditional socioeconomic, clinical, and pathologic factors accounted for the increased relative risk for presenting with advanced-stage prostate cancer in Hispanic but not in African-American men.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013