National Cancer Institute Home at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov
Please wait while this form is being loaded....
The Applied Research Program Web site is no longer maintained. ARP's former staff have moved to the new Healthcare Delivery Research Program, the Behavioral Research Program, or the Epidemiology & Genetics Research Program, and the content from this Web site is being moved to one of those sites as appropriate. Please update your links and bookmarks!

Publication Abstract

Authors: Park ER, Japuntich SJ, Rigotti NA, Traeger L, He Y, Wallace RB, Malin JL, Zallen JP, Keating NL

Title: A snapshot of smokers after lung and colorectal cancer diagnosis.

Journal: Cancer 118(12):3153-64

Date: 2012 Jun 15

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Continued smoking after a cancer diagnosis may adversely affect treatment effectiveness, subsequent cancer risk, and survival. The prevalence of continued smoking after cancer diagnosis is understudied. METHODS: In the multi-regional Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance cohort (lung cancer [N = 2456], colorectal cancer [N = 3063]), the authors examined smoking rates at diagnosis and 5 months after diagnosis and also study factors associated with continued smoking. RESULTS: Overall, 90.2% of patients with lung cancer and 54.8% of patients with colorectal cancer reported ever smoking. At diagnosis, 38.7% of patients with lung cancer and 13.7% of patients with colorectal cancer were smoking; whereas, 5 months after diagnosis, 14.2% of patients with lung cancer and 9.0% of patients with colorectal cancer were smoking. Factors that were associated independently with continued smoking among patients with nonmetastatic lung cancer were coverage by Medicare, other public/unspecified insurance, not receiving chemotherapy, not undergoing surgery, prior cardiovascular disease, lower body mass index, lower emotional support, and higher daily ever-smoking rates (all P < .05). Factors that were associated independently with continued smoking among patients with nonmetastatic colorectal cancer were male sex, high school education, being uninsured, not undergoing surgery, and higher daily ever-smoking rates (all P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: After diagnosis, a substantial minority of patients with lung and colorectal cancers continued smoking. Patients with lung cancer had higher rates of smoking at diagnosis and after diagnosis; whereas patients with colorectal cancer were less likely to quit smoking after diagnosis. Factors that were associated with continued smoking differed between lung and colorectal cancer patients. Future smoking-cessation efforts should examine differences by cancer type, particularly when comparing cancers for which smoking is a well established risk factor versus cancers for which it is not.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013