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Publication Abstract

Authors: Presley CJ, Raldow AC, Cramer LD, Soulos PR, Long JB, Yu JB, Makarov DV, Gross CP

Title: A new approach to understanding racial disparities in prostate cancer treatment

Journal: J Geriatr Oncol 4(1):1-8

Date: 2013 Jan

Abstract: Abstract Objective:Previous studies addressing racial disparities in treatment for early-stage prostate cancer have focused on the etiology of undertreatment of black men. Our objective was to determine whether racial disparities are attributable to undertreatment, overtreatment, or both.Methods:Using the SEER-Medicare dataset, we identified men 67-84years-old diagnosed with localized prostate cancer from 1998 to 2007. We stratified men into clinical benefit groups using tumor aggressiveness and life expectancy. Low-benefit was defined as low-risk tumors and life expectancy <10years; high-benefit as moderate-risk tumors and life expectancy ≥10years; all others were intermediate-benefit. Logistic regression modeled the association between race and treatment (radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy) across benefit groups.Results:Of 68,817 men (9.8% black and 90.2% white), 56.2% of black and 66.3% of white men received treatment (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=0.65; 95% CI, 0.62-0.69). The percent of low-, intermediate-, and high-benefit men who received treatment was 56.7%, 68.4%, and 79.6%, respectively (P=<0.001). In the low-benefit group, 51.9% of black vs. 57.2% of white patients received treatment (OR=0.74; 95% CI, 0.67-0.81) compared to 57.2% vs. 69.6% in the intermediate-benefit group (OR=0.64; 95% CI, 0.59-0.70). Racial disparity was largest in the high-benefit group (64.2% of black vs. 81.4% of white patients received treatment; OR=0.57; 95% CI, 0.48-0.68). The interaction between race and clinical benefit was significant (P<0.001).Conclusion:Racial disparities were largest among men most likely to benefit from treatment. However, a substantial proportion of both black and white men with a low clinical benefit received treatment, indicating a high level of overtreatment.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013