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Publication Abstract

Authors: Beadle BM, Liao KP, Elting LS, Buchholz TA, Ang KK, Garden AS, Guadagnolo BA

Title: Improved survival using intensity-modulated radiation therapy in head and neck cancers: a SEER-Medicare analysis.

Journal: Cancer 120(5):702-10

Date: 2014 Mar 01

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a technologically advanced, and more expensive, method of delivering radiation therapy with a goal of minimizing toxicity. It has been widely adopted for head and neck cancers; however, its comparative impact on cancer control and survival remains unknown. The goal of this analysis was to compare the cause-specific survival (CSS) for patients with head and neck cancers treated with IMRT versus non-IMRT from 1999 to 2007. METHODS: CSS was determined using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database and analyzed regarding treatment details, including the use of IMRT versus non-IMRT, using claims data. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated by the frailty model with a propensity score matching cohort and instrumental variable analysis. RESULTS: A total of 3172 patients were identified. With a median follow-up of 40 months, patients treated with IMRT had a statistically significant improvement in CSS compared with those treated with non-IMRT (84.1% versus 66.0%; P <‚ÄČ.001). When each anatomic subsite was analyzed separately, all respective subgroups of patients treated with IMRT had better CSS than those treated with non-IMRT. In multivariable survival analyses, patients treated with IMRT were associated with better CSS (HR = 0.72, 95% confidence interval = 0.59 to 0.90 for propensity score matching; HR = 0.60, 95% confidence interval = 0.41 to 0.88 for instrumental variable analysis). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with head and neck cancers who were treated with IMRT experienced significant improvements in CSS compared with patients treated with non-IMRT techniques. This suggests there may be benefits to IMRT in cancer outcomes, in addition to toxicity reduction, for this patient population.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013