National Cancer Institute Home at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov
Please wait while this form is being loaded....
The Applied Research Program Web site is no longer maintained. ARP's former staff have moved to the new Healthcare Delivery Research Program, the Behavioral Research Program, or the Epidemiology & Genetics Research Program, and the content from this Web site is being moved to one of those sites as appropriate. Please update your links and bookmarks!

Publication Abstract

Authors: Carroll NM, Ritzwoller DP, Stopponi MA, Johnson CC

Title: Identifying and oversampling Hispanics by the Passel-Word surname list for enrollment in a web-based nutritional intervention.

Journal: Ethn Dis 20(1):15-21

Date: 2010 Winter

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To describe the enrollment rates and characteristics of Hispanics and non-Hispanics from Kaiser Permanente Colorado invited to participate in a web-based intervention promoting increased fruit and vegetable consumption. DESIGN: Hispanics were identified by the Passel-Word Spanish surname list. Characteristics associated with the likelihood of enrollment overall and by ethnicity were examined by logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 174 (6.1%) probable Hispanics and 340 probable non-Hispanics (11.8%) enrolled. Hispanics were 48% less likely to enroll than non-Hispanics, females were almost four times as likely to enroll as males, and those living in a census tract associated with higher income levels were 41% more likely to enroll than other income groups. Among Hispanics, females were 87% more likely to enroll than males and those living in a census tract associated with higher income levels were 62% more likely to enroll than other income groups. Among non-Hispanics, the odds for enrolling increased 14% for each decade increase of age, females were 43% more likely to enroll than males and those living in a census tract associated with higher income levels were 68% more likely to enroll than those in other income groups. CONCLUSION: Identifying Hispanics through surname for oversampling can be successful in terms of sampling yield and accuracy. However, our results suggest that Hispanics are less likely to enroll in a web-based nutritional intervention. Additional research is needed to identify methods of attracting more Hispanic subjects to these kinds of interventions.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013