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Publication Abstract

Authors: Coughlin SS, Uhler RJ, Bobo JK, Caplan L

Title: Breast cancer screening practices among women in the United States, 2000.

Journal: Cancer Causes Control 15(2):159-70

Date: 2004 Mar

Abstract: Results from recent studies indicate that many women in the US undergo routine screening for breast cancer, but some groups of women are under-screened. In this study, we examined the breast cancer screening practices of white and black women in the United States, according to Hispanic ethnicity and other factors, using data from the 2000 National Health Interview Survey. Among women aged > or =40 years, 71.2% (95% confidence interval, CI: 70.0-72.4%) of the 8201 white women and 67.6% (95% CI: 64.5-70.6%) of the 1474 black women in this sample reported having a mammogram in the past two years. About 60.3% (95% CI: 56.7-70.3%) of 970 Hispanic women (including those who reported they were white or black) and 71.5% (95% CI: 70.3-72.7%) of 8705 non-Hispanic women reported having a mammogram in the past two years. About 74.8% (95% CI: 73.8-76.8%) of 8176 white women and 73.8% (95% CI: 71.1-76.6%) of 1471 black women aged > or =40 years had received a clinical breast examination in the past two years. About 60.1% (95% CI: 56.1-64.0%) of 969 Hispanic women (including those who reported they were white or black) and 75.6% (95% CI: 74.6-76.6%) of 8678 non-Hispanic women had received a clinical breast examination in the past two years. Women with lower incomes, those with less education, and recent immigrants were less likely to be screened. Women who had a usual source of health care and those with health insurance coverage were more likely to have been screened. These results underscore the need for continued efforts to ensure that uninsured women and those who are medically underserved have access to cancer screening services.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013