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Measurement Error Webinar Series

Welcome to the Measurement Error Webinar Series, organized by collaborators from the National Cancer Institute, the Office of Dietary Supplements, the United States Department of Agriculture, the Gertner Institute, Texas A&M University, and Wake Forest University. The series is intended for nutritionists, epidemiologists, statisticians, graduate students, and others with an interest in measurement error in dietary intake data. A basic level of familiarity with statistics and dietary assessment is recommended.

The goal of the webinar series is to provide participants with an understanding of:

  • the sources and magnitudes of dietary measurement errors;
  • how measurement error may affect estimates of usual dietary intake distributions;
  • how measurement error may affect analyses of diet-health relationships; and
  • how the effects of measurement error may be mitigated.

Concepts related to accounting for complex survey methods, estimating total intakes from diet and supplements, and the use of multiple dietary assessment instruments and self-report data along with biomarker data to reduce measurement error are also addressed.

An archive of the webinar series, which ran from September 20th to December 6th, 2011, is provided below. Session descriptions provide details on the topics covered and the objectives, recommended resources, and key terms for each webinar. In addition to the recordings, which can be viewed online, multiple versions of the slide sets are available for download. The slides with speaking notes will display two pages at a time by default to facilitate on-screen viewing. For economical printing, a version with six slides per page is also provided. Additional supporting materials, including a glossary, are available from the links at the left of this page.

Session Descriptions

Webinar 1: Introduction to the problem of measurement error in dietary intake data

Photo of Sharon Kirkpatrick

About the Presenter: Dr. Sharon Kirkpatrick is a nutrition researcher at the National Cancer Institute and organizer of this webinar series. Her work at the National Cancer Institute has largely focused on methods of assessing diet and of analyzing dietary intake data to account for measurement error. She is a member of the Automated Self-administered 24-hour Recall (ASA24) team, leading dissemination activities and user support in addition to contributing to the design and development of ASA24. Other research interests include health disparities and food security. Dr. Kirkpatrick earned her PhD in Nutritional Sciences and MHSc in Community Nutrition from the University of Toronto.

Webinar 2: Estimating usual intake distributions for dietary components consumed daily by nearly all persons

Photo of Kevin Dodd

About the Presenter: Dr. Kevin Dodd is a mathematical statistician in the Biometry Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, at the National Cancer Institute. His primary research interests focus on statistical models for dietary intake and physical activity, with special emphasis on population surveillance. He has been instrumental in the development of novel statistical methods for estimating long-term exposure from short-term observations for the past twenty years; beginning with the Iowa State University method for estimating usual nutrient intake distributions and culminating in the more recent National Cancer Institute method for modeling usual intake of episodically consumed foods. Dr. Dodd earned his PhD and MS in Statistics from Iowa State University.

Webinar 3: Estimating usual intake distributions for dietary components consumed episodically

Photo of Janet Tooze

About the Presenter: Dr. Janet Tooze is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Division of Public Health Sciences, at Wake Forest School of Medicine. Dr. Tooze is a biostatistician with expertise in longitudinal data analysis and nonlinear mixed effect models, with specific applications to diet and physical activity assessment. Since 2002, she has been a member of the Surveillance Measurement Error Group of the National Cancer Institute. In this capacity, she has developed methods for estimating the usual intake of foods and nutrients in a unified framework, with applications to nutritional surveillance and epidemiology. Dr. Tooze received a PhD in Biometrics from the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and an MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Webinar 4: Accounting for complex survey design in modeling usual intake

Photo of Kevin Dodd

About the presenter: Please refer to Dr. Dodd's biosketch under Webinar 2 above.

Webinar 5: Estimating usual total nutrient intake distributions from diet and supplements

Photo of Regan Bailey

About the presenter: Dr. Regan Bailey is a nutritional epidemiologist in the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Bailey's research focuses on methodological issues related to dietary assessment. Her work involves combining nutrient intakes from foods and from dietary supplements to produce total nutrient intakes in nationally-representative data sets, primarily centering on data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Dr. Bailey is the co-director of ODS's Dietary Supplement Research Practicum. She received her PhD in Nutrition Science from the Pennsylvania State University and MS in Food and Nutrition from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

Webinar 6: The problem of measurement error when examining diet-health relationships

Photo of Laurence Freedman

About the presenter: Dr. Laurence (Larry) Freedman is currently Director of the Biostatistics Unit at the Gertner Institute for Epidemiology at Tel Hashomer, Israel, where he directs a research and consulting program in biostatistics and advises the government on public health policy. He has published extensively in the biostatistical literature on topics including therapeutic and prevention trials, epidemiology, and nutrition, with particular emphases on cancer research and nutritional epidemiology. He was founding co-editor of Statistics in Medicine, and has also served as co-Editor of Biometrics. In 2008, he received an award for outstanding contributions to the International Biometric Society, and also delivered the annual Armitage lecture to the Medical Research Council in Cambridge, UK. Dr. Freedman earned his PhD in Biostatistics and MA in Mathematics from Cambridge University.

Webinar 7: Assessing diet-health relationships with FFQ: focus on dietary components consumed daily by nearly all persons

Photo of Douglas Midthune

About the presenter: Douglas Midthune is a mathematical statistician in the Biometry Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, at the National Cancer Institute. His areas of research include statistical methods for nutritional epidemiology and measurement error in dietary assessment, and he has published many papers on these topics. He is an integral member of the Surveillance Measurement Error Group of the National Cancer Institute, helping to develop the National Cancer Institute method for modeling episodically consumed foods. Recently, he has played an important role in the extension of the method to accommodate simultaneous modeling of multiple nutrients and foods, with applications to both estimation of usual intake distributions and examination of diet and health relationships. Mr. Midthune earned his MS in Statistics from the University of Maryland.

Webinar 8: Assessing diet-health relationships with FFQ: focus on episodically-consumed dietary components

Photo of Victor Kipnis

About the presenter: Dr. Victor Kipnis is a mathematical statistician in the Biometry Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, at the National Cancer Institute. He has authored and co-authored a number of pivotal publications examining the structure of dietary measurement error, its effects on study results, and methods of adjusting for it in nutritional surveillance and epidemiology. Most recently, Dr. Kipnis has been involved in the development of statistical approaches to estimate usual intake distributions of episodically consumed dietary components and to adjust estimated relationships between those dietary components and health outcomes for measurement error. He played a leading role in the design and analysis of the Observing Protein and Energy Nutrition biomarker study carried out at the National Cancer Institute in 2001-2002. Dr. Kipnis received a PhD in Statistics and MS in Mathematics from the Moscow State University.

Webinar 9: Estimating usual intake distributions for multivariate dietary variables

Photo of Raymond Carroll

About the presenter: Dr. Raymond Carroll is Distinguished Professor of Statistics at Texas A&M University. He is a member of the Faculties of Nutrition and of Toxicology and holds a courtesy appointment in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. Dr. Carroll’s work on statistical methodology has found application in a broad variety of fields, including nutritional epidemiology. He wrote the authoritative text on modern statistical analysis of data when exposure measurements are subject to uncertainties, the so-called measurement error problem. He has won many honors in the profession, including the 1988 COPSS Presidents’ Award, given annually by the North American statistical societies to the outstanding statistician under the age of 40. He was the founding chair of the Biostatistics Study Section at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Carroll received his PhD from Purdue University.

Webinar 10: Combining self-report dietary assessment instruments to reduce the effects of measurement error

Photo of Douglas Midthune

About the presenter: Please refer to Mr. Midthune's biosketch under Webinar 7 above.

Webinar 11: Combining self-report dietary intake data and biomarker data to reduce the effects of measurement error

Photo of Laurence Freedman

About the presenter: Please refer to Dr. Freedman's biosketch under Webinar 6 above.

Webinar 12: Assessing diet-health relationships using a short-term unbiased dietary instrument: focus on risk models with multiple dietary components

Photo of Victor Kipnis

About the presenter: Please refer to Dr. Kipnis' biosketch under Webinar 8 above.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013