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Publication Abstract

Authors: Haque R, Achacoso NS, Fletcher SW, Nekhlyudov L, Collins LC, Schnitt SJ, Quesenberry CP Jr, Habel LA

Title: Treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ among patients cared for in large integrated health plans.

Journal: Am J Manag Care 16(5):351-60

Date: 2010 May

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To examine whether use of adjuvant therapy varies by race/ethnicity among patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) at 3 integrated health plan delivery sites based in California and Massachusetts. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study nested within a cohort of women diagnosed as having DCIS between 1990 and 2001. METHODS: We reviewed medical records of 3000 non-Hispanic white (69%), black (10%), Hispanic (9%), and Asian or Pacific Islander (12%) women diagnosed as having DCIS between 1990 and 2001 and treated with breast-conserving therapy. chi(2) Test and multinomial logistic regression analysis were used to examine the association between race/ethnicity and use of adjuvant treatments after controlling for patient and clinical variables, including certain pathologic factors. RESULTS: We found no significant differences in DCIS adjuvant treatment among racial/ethnic groups in bivariate or multinomial analyses after adjusting for demographic characteristics, comorbidity, and clinical factors. Minority women were as likely to undergo adjuvant radiation therapy as non-Hispanic white women. However, women 70 years or older (odds ratio, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-0.51) and women who lived in areas with low geocoded median family income (odds ratio, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.48-0.89) were less likely to receive adjuvant radiation therapy. Tumor size and comedo histologic growth pattern were associated with increased likelihood of receiving radiation therapy. CONCLUSION: Use of adjuvant therapy by minority women in these managed care plans is similar to that by non-Hispanic white women, although use was less among older women and among women who lived in poorer neighborhoods.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013