National Cancer Institute Home at the National Institutes of Health |
Please wait while this form is being loaded....
The Applied Research Program Web site is no longer maintained. ARP's former staff have moved to the new Healthcare Delivery Research Program, the Behavioral Research Program, or the Epidemiology & Genomics Research Program, and the content from this Web site is being moved to one of those sites as appropriate. Please update your links and bookmarks!

Publication Abstract

Authors: Klabunde CN, Vernon SW, Nadel MR, Breen N, Seeff LC, Brown ML

Title: Barriers to colorectal cancer screening: a comparison of reports from primary care physicians and average-risk adults.

Journal: Med Care 43(9):939-44

Date: 2005 Sep

Abstract: BACKGROUND: Barriers to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening are not well understood. OBJECTIVES: We sought to compare barriers to CRC screening reported by primary care physicians (PCPs) and by average-risk adults, and to examine characteristics of average-risk adults who identified lack of provider recommendation as a major barrier to CRC screening. RESEARCH DESIGN: This was a comparative study using data from the 1999-2000 Survey of Colorectal Cancer Screening Practices and the 2000 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). SUBJECTS: We recruited nationally representative samples of PCPs (n= 1235) from the SCCSP and average-risk adults (n = 6497) from the NHIS. MEASURES: We measured barriers to CRC screening identified by PCPs and average-risk adults who were not current with screening. RESULTS: Both PCPs and average-risk adults identified lack of patient awareness and physician recommendation as key barriers to obtaining CRC screening. PCPs also frequently cited patient embarrassment/anxiety about testing and test cost/lack of insurance coverage, but few adults identified these as major barriers. Of adults not current with testing, those who had visited a doctor in the past year or had health insurance were more likely to report lack of physician recommendation as the main reason they were not up-to-date compared with their counterparts with no doctor visit or health insurance. Only 10% of adults not current with testing and who had a doctor visit in the past year reported receiving a screening recommendation. CONCLUSIONS: A need exists for continued efforts to educate the public about CRC and the important role of screening in preventing this disease. Practice-based strategies to systematically prompt health care providers to discuss CRC screening with eligible patients also are required.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013