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Publication Abstract

Authors: Simunovic M, Rempel E, Thériault ME, Baxter NN, Virnig BA, Meropol NJ, Levine MN

Title: Influence of delays to nonemergent colon cancer surgery on operative mortality, disease-specific survival and overall survival.

Journal: Can J Surg 52(4):E79-E86

Date: 2009 Aug

Abstract: BACKGROUND: There has been minimal research on the influence of delays for cancer treatments on patient outcomes. We measured the influence of delays to nonemergent colon cancer surgery on operative mortality, disease-specific survival and overall survival. METHODS: We used the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare databases (1993-1996) to identify patients who underwent nonemergent colon cancer surgery. We assessed 2 time intervals: surgeon consult to hospital admission for surgery and first diagnostic test for colon cancer to hospital admission. Follow-up data were available to the end of 2003. We selected the time intervals to create patient groups with clinical relevance and they did not extend past 120 days. RESULTS: We identified 7989 patients who underwent nonemergent colon cancer surgery. Median delays from surgeon consult to admission and from first diagnostic test to admission were 7 and 17 days, respectively. The odds of operative mortality were similar if the consult-to-admission interval was 22 days or more versus 1-7 days (odds ratio [OR] 1.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6-1.8, p = 0.91) or if the test-to-admission interval was 43 days or more versus 1-14 days (OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.4-1.5, p = 0.51), respectively. For these same respective interval comparisons, disease-specific survival was not influenced by the consult-to-admission wait (hazard ratio [HR] 1.0, 95% CI 0.9-1.2, p = 0.91) or the test-to-admission wait (HR 1.0, 95% CI 0.8-1.1, p = 0.63). The risk of death was slightly greater if the consult-to-admission interval was 22 or more days versus 1-7 days (HR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.2, p = 0.013) and if the test-to-admission interval was 43 days or more versus 1-14 days (HR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1-1.3, p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: It is unlikely that delays to nonemergent colon cancer surgery longer than 3 weeks from initial surgical consult or longer than 6 weeks from first diagnostic test negatively impact operative mortality, disease-specific survival or overall survival.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013