National Cancer Institute Home at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov
Please wait while this form is being loaded....
The Applied Research Program Web site is no longer maintained. ARP's former staff have moved to the new Healthcare Delivery Research Program, the Behavioral Research Program, or the Epidemiology & Genetics Research Program, and the content from this Web site is being moved to one of those sites as appropriate. Please update your links and bookmarks!

Publication Abstract

Authors: Billmeier SE, Ayanian JZ, He Y, Jaklitsch MT, Rogers SO

Title: Predictors of nursing home admission, severe functional impairment, or death one year after surgery for non-small cell lung cancer.

Journal: Ann Surg 257(3):555-63

Date: 2013 Mar

Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To assess factors associated with nursing home admission, severe functional impairment, or death 1 year after surgery for stage I-IIIa non-small cell lung cancer. BACKGROUND: Patients perceive long-term disability to be one of the most undesirable complications of lung cancer treatment. METHODS: A multiregional cohort was surveyed 12 months after surgery. Logistic regression was used to determine adjusted predictors of long-term disability. Recursive partitioning was used to create a risk index based on preoperative factors. RESULTS: Of the 1007 patients, 146 (15%) were admitted to a nursing home or died by 1 year after surgery, with higher risk among patients 80 years or older, those with severe comorbidities, and those with stage II-IIIa disease (all Ps ≤ 0.01). Among 759 survivors who completed the follow-up survey, 51 (7%) were admitted to a nursing home or reported inability to get out of bed, dress or wash themselves, or perform usual activities. Patients with moderate comorbidities (P < 0.001) or lack of high school diploma (P = 0.03) were more likely to experience nursing home admission or severe functional impairment. The risk of nursing home admission, severe functional impairment, or death was low (16%) for patients younger than 75 years and for those 75 years or older with stage I disease, intermediate (33%) for patients 75 years or older with stage II-IIIa disease and no or mild comorbidities, and high (60%) for those 75 years or older with stage II-IIIa disease and moderate or severe comorbidities. CONCLUSIONS: Patients' risk of long-term disability should be incorporated in preoperative counseling.

Last Modified: 03 Sep 2013